How to tease better, using detail.

Tease writing techniques are in the top 2 most searched topics on Survive. We have a whole section dedicated to tease writing. Tease writing is very different than writing news copy, and it can be tough to learn at first. So we try and fill in the training gap with simple techniques to help you quickly gain confidence when writing teases!

This article is focusing on how to pick what part of a story to tease. We’ve gone over how to pick stories to tease in the past. But that is just one part of the beast. The other big trick to effective teasing is figuring what part of the story you picked will make viewers stay through that commercial break. So let’s dive in.

The simplest, most effective way to pick how to tease a story is simply to choose a detail in the story and hit on it. This may seem counterintuitive to all the consultant seminars and worksheets that say do not give the story away. Notice, I said a detail, not the most important part of the story. You can include a fact, and still not give the whole story away. In fact, viewers are very savvy to gimmicks, so you have to give them something of substance to draw them in anyway. Why not hone in on 1 particular element? 

Let’s list some examples, from stories that frankly most of us dread having to tease. 1st the boring political story, with no visuals.  Look for an impact element. For example a candidate campaign stop. If the candidate did not reveal a new policy never discussed before, ask the photog and/or mmm covering it if there was anything said about your town in particular.  Then tease that. If the stump speech was super generic, did a group in the audience ask interesting questions? Pick one of those, then focus on the answer or politicians lack of answer in the actual story.

Now let’s talk court cases that again really can be visually boring and hard to tease but sometimes are really important. Was a new piece of evidence brought forth that was interesting? Tease that. Did the attorneys push for something to be thrown out? Might be an interesting tease, as to why. “Big debate today in the (name) trial, over 1 witness statement. Now the judge has to decide if that statement holds up in this case.”  I didn’t say what the statement was, so viewers will still want to know. Even if this is the point of the story being in your newscast at all, it can be good to hit on a detail, just not what the actual statement says.

Teasing an education story, usually is most effective when picking a detail. Things like, “Why a local superintendent is telling the state its wrong about testing.” Or “we keep hearing less kids at school, but wait until you see how packed some classrooms are.” 

The biggest thing to keep in mind is you want to pick a detail that is intriguing, but doesn’t give the entire story away. If there is only 1 reason you are updating the story and for some reason you must tease it, then give a detail about the fact you are updating, not the whole fact. 

Happy tease writing!

Share